EU Cookies

Quelle:http://ec.europa.eu/internal_market/cookies/index_de.htm

Cookies

Damit dieses Internetportal ordnungsgemäß funktioniert, legen wir manchmal kleine Dateien – sogenannte Cookies – auf Ihrem Gerät ab. Das ist bei den meisten grAll Pagesoßen Websites üblich.

Was sind Cookies?

Ein Cookie ist eine kleine Textdatei, die ein Webportal auf Ihrem Rechner, Tablet-Computer oder Smartphone hinterlässt, wenn Sie es besuchen. So kann sich das Portal bestimmte Eingaben und Einstellungen (z. B. Login, Sprache, Schriftgröße und andere Anzeigepräferenzen) über einen bestimmten Zeitraum „merken“, und Sie brauchen diese nicht bei jedem weiteren Besuch und beim Navigieren im Portal erneut vorzunehmen.

Wie setzen wir Cookies ein?

Dieses Webportal legt keine Cookies auf Ihrem Gerät ab. Der Inhalt mancher Seiten stammt von anderen externen Websites, die jedoch Cookies verschicken können:

Kontrolle über Cookies

Sie können Cookies nach Belieben steuern und/oder löschen. Wie, erfahren Sie hier: AllAboutCookies.org. Sie können alle auf Ihrem Rechner abgelegten Cookies löschen und die meisten Browser so einstellen, dass die Ablage von Cookies verhindert wird. Dann müssen Sie aber möglicherweise einige Einstellungen bei jedem Besuch einer Seite manuell vornehmen und die Beeinträchtigung mancher Funktionen in Kauf nehmen.
Quelle: http://ec.europa.eu/ipg/basics/legal/cookies/index_en.htm



Description

Websites mainly use cookies to:

  • identify users
  • remember users’ custom preferences
  • help users complete tasks without having to re‑enter information when browsing from one page to another or when visiting the site later.

Cookies can also be used for online behavioural target advertising and to show adverts relevant to something that the user searched for in the past.

How are they used?

The web server supplying the webpage can store a cookie on the user’s computer or mobile device. An external web server that manages files included or referenced in the webpage is also able to store cookies. All these cookies are called http header cookies. Another way of storing cookies is through JavaScript code contained or referenced in that page.

Each time the user requests a new page, the web server can receive the values of the cookies it previously set and return the page with content relating to these values. Similarly, JavaScript code is able to read a cookie belonging to its domain and perform an action accordingly.

What are the different types of cookies?

A cookie can be classified by its lifespan and the domain to which it belongs. By lifespan, a cookie is either a:

  • session cookie which is erased when the user closes the browser or
  • persistent cookie which remains on the user’s computer/device for a pre-defined period of time.

As for the domain to which it belongs, there are either:

  • first-party cookies which are set by the web server of the visited page and share the same domain
  • third-party cookies stored by a different domain to the visited page’s domain. This can happen when the webpage references a file, such as JavaScript, located outside its domain.

EU legislation on cookies

EUROPA websites must follow the Commission’s guidelines on privacy and data protection and inform users that cookies are not being used to gather information unnecessarily.

The ePrivacy directive – more specifically Article 5(3) – requires prior informed consent for storage or for access to information stored on a user’s terminal equipment. In other words, you must ask users if they agree to most cookies and similar technologies (e.g. web beacons, Flash cookies, etc.) before the site starts to use them.

For consent to be valid, it must be informed, specific, freely given and must constitute a real indication of the individual’s wishes.

However, some cookies are exempt from this requirement. Consent is not required if the cookie is:

  • used for the sole purpose of carrying out the transmission of a communication, and
  • strictly necessary in order for the provider of an information society service explicitly required by the user to provide that service.

Cookies clearly exempt from consent according to the EU advisory body on data protection- WP29pdf include:

  • user‑input cookies (session-id) such as first‑party cookies to keep track of the user’s input when filling online forms, shopping carts, etc., for the duration of a session or persistent cookies limited to a few hours in some cases
  • authentication cookies, to identify the user once he has logged in, for the duration of a session
  • user‑centric security cookies, used to detect authentication abuses, for a limited persistent duration
  • multimedia content player cookies, used to store technical data to play back video or audio content, for the duration of a session
  • load‑balancing cookies, for the duration of session
  • user‑interface customisation cookies such as language or font preferences, for the duration of a session (or slightly longer)
  • third‑party social plug‑in content‑sharing cookies, for logged‑in members of a social network.

Use on EUROPA

The use of cookies on EUROPA is allowed under certain conditions. You should take the following steps.

  1. Ask yourself whether the use of cookies is essential for a given functionality, and if there is no other, non‑intrusive alternative.
  2. If you think a cookie is essential, ask yourself how intrusive it is: what data does each cookie hold? Is it linked to other information held about the user? Is its lifespan appropriate to its purpose? What type of cookie is it? Is it a first or a third‑party setting the cookie? Who controls the data?
  3. Evaluate for each cookie if informed consent is required or not:
    • first‑party session cookies DO NOT require informed consent.
    • first‑party persistent cookies DO require informed consent. Use only when strictly necessary. The expiry period must not exceed one year.
    • all third‑party session and persistent cookies require informed consent. These cookies should not be used on EUROPA sites, as the data collected may be transferred beyond the EU’s legal jurisdiction.
  4. Before storing cookies, gain consent from the users (if required) by implementing the Cookie Consent Kit in all the pages of any website using cookies that require informed consent.
  5. Inform users about the use of cookies in plain, jargon‑free language in a dedicated “cookie notice” page linked from the service toolbar of the standard templates. This page should explain:
    • why cookies are being used, (to remember users’ actions, identify users, collect traffic information, etc.)
    • if the cookies are essential for the website or a given functionality to work or if they aim to enhance the performance of the website
    • the types of cookies used (e.g. session or permanent, first or third‑party)
    • who controls/accesses the cookie‑related information (website or third‑party)
    • that the cookie will not be used for any purpose other than the one stated
    • how users can withdraw consent.